FAQ

Check some frequently asked questions…

A global citizen is someone who is aware of and understands the wider world – and their place it. They take an active role in their community and work with others to make our planet more equal, fair, tolerant and peaceful.

And it’s about the belief that we can all make a difference.

The world needs active global citizens who are engaged in the world, knowledgeable about its diversity, cultures, faiths and nations and passionate about uniting people around the globe.

Global Tolerance Faces is promoting ONE People, ONE Love and ONE World.

Peaceful coexistence for a sustainable world in peace. Bridging East and West with the Spirit to Unite all people worldwide.

Yes, Global Tolerance Faces Social Media Campaign is independent.

Primarily, we encourage the inter-faith dialogue between Muslims and Christians (but also with other faiths) and contribute to mutual understanding about diversity, culture and we support peace-making in the region of the Middle East and rest of the world.

We definitely need worldwide volunteers for our Global Tolerance Faces Campaign. The process is being worked out and will be put in place very soon. Please wait for an official announcement on the www.globaltolerancefaces.com and on our social media!

We definitely need worldwide volunteers for our Global Tolerance Faces Campaign. The process is being worked out and will be put in place very soon. Please wait for an official announcement on the www.globaltolerancefaces.com and on our social media!

We definitely need worldwide volunteers for our Global Tolerance Faces Campaign. The process is being worked out and will be put in place very soon. Please wait for an official announcement on the www.globaltolerancefaces.com and on our social media!

Contact Us

Sign up to join our Global Tolerance Faces Network Of Change-Makers

 

Get Connected

Social Media of Global Tolerance Faces

Global Tolerance Faces is promoting ONE People, ONE Love and ONE World. Peaceful Coexistence for a Sustainable World in Peace. Bridging East and West with the Spirit to Unite all people worldwide.

 

In Support of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 10 December 1948

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a historic document that was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly at its third session on 10 December 1948 as Resolution 217 at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris, France. Of the then 58 members of the United Nations, 48 voted in favour, none against, eight abstained, and two did not vote.

The_universal_declaration_of_human_rights_10_December_1948
The universal declaration of human rights 10 December 1948.
Picture source: UN – United Nations Department of Public Information

The Declaration consists of a preamble and thirty articles:

The preamble sets out the historical and social causes that led to the necessity of drafting the Declaration.

Articles 1–2 established the basic concepts of dignity, liberty, equality, and brotherhood.
Articles 3–5 established other individual rights, such as the right to life and the prohibition of slavery and torture.
Articles 6–11 refer to the fundamental legality of human rights with specific remedies cited for their defence when violated.
Articles 12–17 established the rights of the individual towards the community (including such things as freedom of movement).
Articles 18–21 sanctioned the so-called “constitutional liberties”, and with spiritual, public, and political freedoms, such as freedom of thought, opinion, religion and conscience, word, and peaceful association of the individual.
Articles 22–27 sanctioned an individual’s economic, social and cultural rights, including healthcare.                                                                    Article 25 states: “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services.” It also makes additional accommodations for security in case of physical debilitation or disability and makes special mention of care given to those in motherhood or childhood.
Articles 28–30 established the general ways of using these rights, the areas in which these rights of the individual can not be applied, and that they can not be overcome against the individual.